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Politics

What's Going on the Week of Feb. 3, 2019

February 4, 2019 - 9:00am

The release of the governor’s budget proposal is a closely watched event each year in the Capitol.

Big numbers get tossed around. Reporters scramble to figure out what the governor wants. Industry groups look at how they fared.

But the truth is, the release of the governor’s budget is only a prelude to the real action. Sometime in April, that will play out as legislative leaders and staff members work behind the scenes to cut deals that will result in a new budget.

Gov. Ron DeSantis released a $91.3 billion budget proposal Friday (yes, definitely a big number). And in the coming week, the action will move to the Legislature. DeSantis’ staff members will fan out to House and Senate panels to explain DeSantis’ proposals in hopes that lawmakers will go along.

House and Senate leaders released statements Friday that avoided diving into the details of DeSantis’ proposal, though it’s clear changes will be coming. House Speaker Jose Oliva, for example, appeared to call for a tighter budget.

“The Constitution requires a balanced budget, but we have an additional responsibility to respect Florida’s taxpayers by spending each dollar wisely,” Oliva, R-Miami Lakes, said. “To meet this goal, the House will craft a budget that reduces per capita spending. I am confident Florida’s economic success will continue under Governor DeSantis as long as we keep taxes low and spending in check.”

Senate President Bill Galvano, meanwhile, said DeSantis’ budget reflected “many of our shared priorities.” But he also said senators are waiting for a new estimate of general-revenue taxes later this month. That estimate will help determine how much money lawmakers have to spend during the 60-day legislative session that starts March 5.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2019

Legislature:

SUPERINTENDENT SUSPENSION DISCUSSED: Senate Special Master Dudley Goodlette will hold a case-management conference in an appeal by suspended Okaloosa County Superintendent of Schools Mary Beth Jackson. Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended Jackson in January, but she appealed to the Senate. Goodlette, a former state House member from Collier County, was appointed by Senate President Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, to serve as special master. (Monday, 11 a.m., 401 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

SEXUAL BATTERY PROSECUTIONS AT ISSUE: The Senate Criminal Justice Committee will take up a series of bills, including a proposal (SB 130), filed by Sen. Linda Stewart, D-Orlando, that would eliminate a statute of limitations on the prosecution of sexual batteries when victims are under age 18. (Monday, 1:30 p.m., 37 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

MARIJUANA SMOKING BAN TARGETED: The Senate Health Policy Committee will take up a bill (SB 182), filed by Sen. Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, that would eliminate a ban on smoking medical marijuana. Lawmakers in 2017 included a smoking ban in a law that was designed to carry out a constitutional amendment broadly legalizing medical marijuana. But the smoking ban drew a legal challenge, and a Leon County circuit judge ruled that it violated the 2016 constitutional amendment. The state, under former Gov. Rick Scott, appealed the circuit judge’s ruling. Gov. Ron DeSantis, however, has been critical of the smoking ban and has indicated he will drop the appeal if lawmakers do not eliminate the ban. (Monday, 1:30 p.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

CITRUS ISSUES ON MENU: The Senate Agriculture Committee will receive an update on the Florida Department of Citrus from the agency’s executive director, Shannon Shepp. (Monday, 1:30 p.m., 301 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

ASSIGNMENT OF BENEFITS DEBATED: The Senate Banking and Insurance Committee will hold a workshop on a bill (SB 122), filed by Chairman Doug Broxson, R-Gulf Breeze, that is aimed at limiting attorney fees in cases involving the insurance practice known as assignment of benefits. Assignment of benefits is a decades-old practice that involves insurance customers signing over claims to contractors, who do work and ultimately pursue payment from insurers. The issue has become controversial in recent years amid allegations by insurers that the system has become rife with fraud and litigation, driving up consumers’ insurance premiums. Opponents of attorney-fee changes say assignment of benefits and the possibility of litigation help make sure insurers properly take care of claims. (Monday, 4 p.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

CRC REPEAL SOUGHT: The Senate Judiciary Committee will consider a proposal (SJR 362), filed by Sen. Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, that would ask voters to abolish the Florida Constitution Revision Commission. The commission meets every 20 years and has unique power to place proposed constitutional amendments on the ballot. The commission last year placed seven amendments on the November ballot, with all ultimately passing. But it drew controversy and legal challenges, in part, because it lumped together seemingly unrelated issues into single ballot proposals. The commission is next scheduled to meet in 2037 and 2038. If approved by lawmakers, Brandes’ proposal to abolish the commission would go on the 2020 ballot because ending the commission would require changing the state Constitution. (Monday, 4 p.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

DCF SECRETARY GOES BEFORE SENATE PANEL; Chad Poppell, the newly appointed secretary of the Florida Department of Children and Families, is slated to appear at a meeting of the Senate Children, Families and Elder Affairs Committee. (Monday, 4 p.m., 301 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

Also:

CHAMBER ROLLS OUT RECOMMENDATIONS: The Florida Chamber Foundation will hold a regional event in Alachua County to roll out its preliminary “Florida 2030” recommendations. (Monday, 8 a.m., Cade Museum, 811 South Main St., Gainesville.)

HURRICANE RECOVERY AT ISSUE: Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Jared Moskowitz will be the keynote speaker during the “Summit for a Resilient North Florida,” which will focus on recovery from Hurricane Michael. (Monday, 9 a.m. Central time, Rivertown Community Church, 4534 Lafayette St., Marianna.)

ANIMAL ABUSE TARGETED: U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., will appear at a news conference to urge passage of legislation that would make animal cruelty a federal crime. (Monday, 10 a.m., Animal Care and Adoption, 2400 S.W. 42nd St., Fort Lauderdale.)

BUCHANAN APPEARS AT HUMANE SOCIETY: U.S. Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., and Manatee County Sheriff Rick Wells will appear at the Manatee Humane Society to discuss protecting animals and support legislation that would make animal cruelty a federal crime. (Monday, 10 a.m., Manatee Humane Society, 10 a.m., 2515 14th St. West, Bradenton.)

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Legislature:

COALITION FOR CHILDREN HOLDS KICKOFF: Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, is expected to take part in a kickoff breakfast for the Florida Coalition of Children’s annual rally at the Capitol. The rally is a two-day event. (Tuesday, 8 a.m., 22nd floor, the Capitol.)

FINANCIAL LITERACY SOUGHT: The Senate Education Committee will take up a bill (SB 114), filed by Sen. Travis Hutson, R-St. Augustine, that would require students entering ninth grade beginning in the 2019-2020 school year to earn one-half credit in personal financial literacy and money management. The bill is dubbed the “Dorothy L. Hukill Financial Literacy Act,” after the late Sen. Dorothy Hukill, a Port Orange Republican who long pushed for teaching financial literacy in schools. (Tuesday, 10 a.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

SENATORS MOVE FORWARD WITH VAPING BAN: The Senate Innovation, Industry and Technology Committee will take up a proposal (SPB 7012) that would carry out a voter-approved constitutional amendment that bans vaping in indoor workplaces. The bill largely mirrors a longstanding ban on smoking tobacco in indoor workplaces. But in one key difference, it would allow city or county ordinances that would place more-restrictive regulations on vaping. Under state law, only the state can regulate smoking tobacco. The Senate bill also would add vaping to a state law that bars people under age 18 from smoking tobacco within 1,000 feet of schools. Voters approved the constitutional amendment in the Nov. 6 election. (Tuesday, 10 a.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

RETIREMENT SYSTEM AT ISSUE: The Senate Governmental Oversight and Accountability Committee will consider a proposal (SPB 7016) that would set contribution rates for government agencies in the state retirement system. (Tuesday, 10 a.m., 301 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

HOUSE CONSIDERS DESANTIS BUDGET: The House Appropriations Committee will receive a presentation about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. Lawmakers will use the proposal as a starting point as they negotiate a final spending plan during the upcoming legislative session. (Tuesday, 10:30 a.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ON TABLE: The House Education Committee will take up issues related to career and technical education, including a presentation by the Foundation for Excellence in Education about the impact of industry credentials. (Tuesday, 1:30 p.m., Reed Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

IMPACT FEES EYED: The Senate Community Affairs Committee will consider a proposal (SB 144), filed by Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, that would place additional restrictions on the use of impact fees by local governments. (Tuesday, 2 p.m., 301 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

‘BUNDLED’ BALLOT MEASURES TARGETED: The Senate Ethics and Elections Committee will take up a proposal (SJR 74), filed by Sen. Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island, that would impose a single-subject requirement on measures placed on the ballot in the future by the Florida Constitution Revision Commission. The issue drew attention last year after the Constitution Revision Commission bundled seemingly unrelated issues into single proposed constitutional amendments. As an example, one amendment that was approved by voters Nov. 6 combined a ban on offshore oil drilling with a ban on vaping in workplaces. The Constitution Revision Commission, a 37-member panel that meets every 20 years, has unique powers to place measures on the ballot. The commission will not meet again until 2037 in advance of placing measures on the 2038 ballot. If approved by the Legislature, Bradley’s single-subject proposal could go before voters in 2020 and, if passed, would apply to the 2037-2038 Constitution Revision Commission. (Tuesday, 2 p.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

DISTRACTED DRIVING DISCUSSED: The Senate Infrastructure and Security Committee will hold a workshop and panel discussion on distracted driving. The discussion is expected to include representatives of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, the Florida Highway Patrol, the Florida Police Chiefs Association and the Florida Sheriffs Association. (Tuesday, 2 p.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION PRIORITIES OUTLINED: The Alzheimer’s Association will hold a news conference to outline legislative priorities as part of an annual “Rally in Tally” advocacy event. Participants in the news conference are expected to include Department of Elder Affairs Secretary Richard Prudom, state Rep. Matt Willhite, D-Wellington, state Rep. Byron Donalds, R-Naples, and state Rep. Scott Plakon, R-Longwood. (Tuesday, 6 p.m., Old Capitol steps.)

Also:

UTILITY TAX ISSUES ON TABLE: The Florida Public Service Commission will hold a regular commission meeting, followed by a hearing on the impacts of the 2017 federal tax overhaul on Florida Power & Light. During the regular meeting, the commission also will consider the tax overhaul’s impacts on Florida Public Utilities Co. The tax overhaul, in part, cut corporate income-tax rates from 35 percent to 21 percent, and the state’s utilities are expected to pass along savings to customers. (Tuesday, 9:30 a.m., Betty Easley Conference Center, 4075 Esplanade Way, Tallahassee.)

RUBIO HOLDS ‘MOBILE’ OFFICE HOURS: Staff members for U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will hold “mobile” office hours in Miami-Dade, Volusia, Duval and Hardee counties. (Tuesday, 9:30 a.m., Stephen P. Clark Government Center, 111 N.W. First St., Miami. Also, 9:30 a.m., West Volusia Chamber of Commerce, 132 Treemonte Dr., Orange City. Also, 2 p.m., Duval County Library, Webb Wesconnett Branch, 6887 103rd St., Jacksonville. Also, 2:30 p.m., Hardee County Library, 315 North Sixth Ave., Wauchula.)

PHARMACY BOARD MEETS: The Florida Board of Pharmacy will start a two-day meeting. (Tuesday, 1:30 p.m., Four Points by Sheraton Tallahassee, 316 West Tennessee St., Tallahassee.)

INTERCHANGE PROJECT DISCUSSED: The Florida Department of Transportation will hold a public hearing on plans for improvements at the interchange of Interstate 10 and U.S. 29 in Escambia County. (Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Maria K. Young Wedgewood Community Center, 6405 Wagner Road, Pensacola.)

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019

Legislature:

TELECOMMUNICATIONS ON THE TABLE: The House Energy & Utilities Subcommittee will hold a panel discussion on telecommunications law. (Wednesday, 8 a.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

MARIJUANA LAW DISCUSSED: The House Health Quality Subcommittee will hold a discussion about a 2017 law that was designed to carry out a constitutional amendment broadly legalizing medical marijuana. The law has drawn legal challenges because of issues such as a ban on smoking medical marijuana. (Wednesday, 8 a.m., 306 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

HOUSE PANELS EYE BUDGET: The House Transportation & Tourism Appropriations Subcommittee and the House Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee will receive presentations about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Wednesday, Transportation & Tourism, 8 a.m., Reed Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol. Also, Agriculture & Natural Resources, 8:30 a.m., Morris Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

LAWMAKERS WEIGH IN ON VENEZUELA: The House Local, Federal & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee will consider a non-binding memorial (HM 205), filed by Rep. Richard Stark, D-Weston, that would call on Congress to intensify financial sanctions against the regime of Venezuela President Nicolas Maduro and support urging the Venezuelan government to allow humanitarian assistance. (Wednesday, 8:30 a.m., 12 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

DRONE USE CONSIDERED: The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee will take up a bill (HB 75), filed by Rep. Clay Yarborough, R-Jacksonville, that would expand the circumstances in which law-enforcement agencies can use aerial drones. The bill would allow drones for such things as assisting in crowd control or traffic management. (Wednesday, 9 a.m., 404 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

SENATORS GET LOOK AT DESANTIS BUDGET: The Senate Appropriations Committee will receive a presentation about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 state budget. (Wednesday, 10 a.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

PANEL CONSIDERS SCHOOL BOARD TERM LIMITS; The House PreK-12 Quality Subcommittee will take up a proposed constitutional amendment (HJR 229), filed by Rep. Anthony Sabatini, R-Howey-in-the-Hills, that would ask voters to place eight-year term limits on county school-board members. If approved by lawmakers, the proposal would go on the 2020 ballot because it is a proposed constitutional amendment. The state Constitution Revision Commission last year also proposed term limits for school board members. But the Florida Supreme Court blocked the proposed constitutional amendment from going on the November ballot because of a dispute about another education issue in the proposal. (Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., Reed Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

HEALTH CARE REGULATIONS DISCUSSED: The House Health Market Reform Subcommittee will receive a presentation on the “certificate of need” regulatory process for new health-care facilities and programs. Also, it will receive a presentation on ambulatory surgical centers. (Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., 306 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

HIGHER EDUCATION, JUSTICE BUDGETS EYED: The House Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee and the House Justice Appropriations Subcommittee will receive presentations on Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Wednesday, Higher Education, 10:30 a.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol. Also, Justice, 10:30 a.m., Morris Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES ON AGENDA: The House Workforce Development & Tourism Subcommittee will receive overviews of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Enterprise Florida and Visit Florida. (Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., 12 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

HEALTH, TRANSPORTATION BUDGETS DETAILED: The Senate Health and Human Services Appropriations Subcommittee and the Senate Transportation, Tourism and Economic Development Appropriation Subcommittee will receive presentations about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Wednesday, Health and Human Services, 1:30 p.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol. Also, Transportation, Tourism and Economic Development, 1:30 p.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

NOVEMBER ELECTIONS REVIEWED: The House State Affairs Committee and the House Oversight, Transparency & Public Management Subcommittee will hold a joint meeting to review issues in the 2018 general election. A panel will include Nassau County Supervisor of Elections Vicki Cannon, Pasco County Supervisor of Elections Brian Corley, Leon County Supervisor of Elections Mark Earley, Madison County Supervisor of Elections Thomas Hardee, Lafayette County Supervisor of Elections Travis Hart, Volusia County Supervisor of Elections Lisa Lewis and Miami-Dade County Supervisor of Elections Christina White. (Wednesday, 3 p.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

UNIVERSITY BUILDING PROJECTS AT ISSUE: The House Public Integrity & Ethics Committee will receive an update from Marshall Criser, chancellor of the state university system, about improper spending on university building projects. The issue has primarily focused on improper spending at the University of Central Florida. (Wednesday, 3 p.m., 404 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

AGRICULTURE, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, EDUCATION BUDGETS ON TABLE: The Senate Agriculture, Environment and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee, the Senate Criminal and Civil Justice Appropriations Subcommittee and the Senate Education Appropriations Subcommittee will receive presentations about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Wednesday, Agriculture, Environment and General Government, 4 p.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol. Also, Criminal and Civil Justice, 4 p.m., 37 Senate Office Building, the Capitol. Also, Education, 4 p.m., 412 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

Also:

CONTINUING CARE AT ISSUE: The state Continuing Care Advisory Council will meet to discuss issues in the continuing-care industry. (Wednesday, 8:30 a.m., Larson Building, 200 East Gaines St., Tallahassee.)

JUSTICES TAKE UP FPL PLUME COSTS: The Florida Supreme Court will hear arguments in four cases, including a dispute about whether Florida Power & Light should be able to recoup money from customers for a project stemming from a saltwater plume that moved from an FPL plant into nearby groundwater. The state Office of Public Counsel, which represents consumers in utility issues, challenged a decision by the Florida Public Service Commission that would allow FPL to collect at least $176.4 million for the project. The South Florida Water Management District in 2013 determined that “hypersaline” water from a cooling-canal system at FPL’s Turkey Point complex in Miami-Dade County had moved offsite. FPL later entered into agreements with Miami-Dade County and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to fix the problem. The Office of Public Counsel, the Florida Industrial Power Users Group and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy argued that FPL customers should not have to pay for the clean-up project through part of monthly bills that goes toward environmental expenses. But the Public Service Commission unanimously sided with FPL. (Wednesday, 9 a.m., Florida Supreme Court, 500 South Duval St., Tallahassee.)

PAROLE CASES ON AGENDA: The Florida Commission on Offender Review will consider parole cases from various parts of the state. (Wednesday, 9 a.m., Betty Easley Conference Center, 4075 Esplanade Way, Tallahassee.)

PHARMACY BOARD MEETS: The Florida Board of Pharmacy will continue a two-day meeting. (Wednesday, 9 a.m., Four Points by Sheraton Tallahassee, 316 West Tennessee St., Tallahassee.)

RUBIO HOLDS ‘MOBILE’ OFFICE HOURS: Staff members for U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will hold “mobile” office hours in Orange and Duval counties. (Wednesday, 9 a.m., Park of the Americas, 201 Andes Ave., Orlando. Also, 10 a.m., Jacksonville Urban League, 903 Urban St., Jacksonville.)

UNEMPLOYMENT CASES CONSIDERED: The state Reemployment Assistance Appeals Commission will meet. (Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., 101 Rhyne Building, 2740 Centerview Dr., Tallahassee.)

SUPPLY CHAIN ‘SUMMIT’ HELD: The two-day Florida Supply Chain Summit will begin, with keynote speakers from Amazon’s regional operations. (Wednesday, 10 a.m., Disney’s Contemporary Resort, 4600 World Dr., Orlando.)

STATE POPULATION ANALYZED: The Demographic Estimating Conference will analyze Florida population numbers. (Wednesday, 2 p.m., 117 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

I-75 INTERCHANGE DISCUSSED: The Florida Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting on a proposed interchange on Interstate 75 at Northwest 49th Street in Marion County. (Wednesday, 4:30 p.m., Ocala Police Department Community Room, 402 South Pine Ave., Ocala.)

INPUT SOUGHT ON AQUATIC HERBICIDE: The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will hold one in a series of public meetings about the agency’s aquatic plant herbicide-treatment program. (Wednesday, 5:30 p.m., Osceola County Commission chamber, Osceola County Administration Building, 1 Courthouse Square, Kissimmee.)

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Legislature:

ASSIGNMENT OF BENEFITS ON AGENDA: The House Civil Justice Subcommittee will hold a panel discussion on the controversial insurance practice known as assignment of benefits. Speakers are expected to include state Insurance Commissioner David Altmaier and Citizens Property Insurance Corp. President and Chief Executive Officer Barry Gilway. (Thursday, 8 a.m., 404 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

‘TALENT DEVELOPMENT’ ON TABLE: The House Higher Education & Career Readiness Subcommittee will hold a workshop related to “talent development” in the state. The meeting will include presentations by agencies and groups including the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, CareerSource Florida and the Florida Chamber of Commerce. (Thursday, 8 a.m., 306 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

COMMUNITY-BASED SYSTEM DISCUSSSED: The House Children, Families & Seniors Subcommittee will host a panel discussion about the state’s community-based child welfare system. (Thursday, 8:30 a.m., 12 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

EDUCATION BUDGET DETAILED: The House PreK-12 Appropriations Subcommittee will receive a presentation on Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Thursday, 8:30 a.m., Reed Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

LOTTERY ISSUES EXPLAINED: The House Gaming Control Subcommittee will receive an overview of the Florida Lottery. (Thursday, 9 a.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

VETERANS’ ISSUES DISCUSSED: The Senate Military and Veterans Affairs and Space Committee will receive a presentation from the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Former Rep. Danny Burgess, R-Zephyrhills, was recently named executive director of the department. (Thursday, 10 a.m., 37 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

SEPTIC SYSTEMS GET ATTENTION: The House Agriculture & Natural Resources Subcommittee will receive an overview from the Florida Department of Health and the Department of Environmental Protection about issues related to septic systems. (Thursday, 10:30 a.m., 12 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

‘DEREGATHON’ DETAILED: The House Business & Professions Subcommittee will receive an update from Department of Business and Professional Regulation Secretary Halsey Beshears about “Deregathon,” an event held to discuss ways to reduce regulations. (Thursday, 10:30 a.m., 212 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS, HEALTH BUDGETS EYED: The House Government Operations & Technology Appropriations Subcommittee and the House Health Care Appropriations Subcommittee will receive presentations about Gov. Ron DeSantis’ proposed 2019-2020 budget. (Thursday, Government Operations & Technology, 10:30 a.m., Morris Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol. Also, Health Care, 10:30 a.m., 404 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP SCHOOLS DISCUSSED: The House PreK-12 Innovation Subcommittee will receive a presentation on community partnership schools. (Thursday, 10:30 a.m., 306 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

LICENSE PLATES, DESIGNATIONS ON AGENDA: The House Transportation & Infrastructure Subcommittee will take up a series of bills dealing with specialty license plates and transportation-facility designations. (Thursday, 10:30 a.m., Reed Hall, House Office Building, the Capitol.)

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AT ISSUE: The Joint Administrative Procedures Committee will hold a workshop on the Administrative Procedure Act. (Thursday, 1:30 p.m., 404 House Office Building, the Capitol.)

KELLY GIVES OVERVIEW: The Joint Committee on Public Counsel Oversight will receive a presentation from state Public Counsel J.R. Kelly, whose office represents consumers in utility issues. (Thursday, 1:30 p.m., 301 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

LOCAL AUDITS WEIGHED: The Joint Legislative Auditing Committee will consider a request by Rep. Randy Fine, R-Palm Bay, to conduct an audit related to the city of Melbourne and a request from Rep. Ralph Massullo, R-Lecanto, to conduct an audit related to the Citrus County Hospital Board. (Thursday, 1:30 p.m., 110 Senate Office Building, the Capitol.)

Also:

JUSTICES HEAR PANHANDLE MURDER CASE: The Florida Supreme Court will hear arguments in four cases, including an appeal by Johnny Mack Sketo Calhoun, who was convicted of first-degree murder in the 2010 death of Mia Brown in Holmes County. Brown’s body was found in the trunk of a burned car in Alabama. (Thursday, 9 a.m., Florida Supreme Court, 500 South Duval St., Tallahassee.)

RUBIO HOLDS ‘MOBILE’ OFFICE HOURS: Staff members for U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will hold “mobile” office hours in Duval County. (Thursday, 10 a.m., Jacksonville Urban League, 903 Union St., Jacksonville.)

SUPREME COURT RELEASES OPINIONS: The Florida Supreme Court is scheduled to release its weekly opinions. (Thursday, 11 a.m.)

TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETS: The Florida Transportation Commission is scheduled to meet. (Thursday, 1 p.m., Florida Department of Transportation, 605 Suwannee St., Tallahassee.)

PRO BONO AWARDS PRESENTED: A ceremony will be held at the Florida Supreme Court to present awards to attorneys for their pro bono legal service. Among the recipients will be Miami attorney Patricia Redmond, who will receive the Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award, the highest statewide pro bono award, according to The Florida Bar. Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Canady is expected to take part in the ceremony. (Thursday, 3:30 p.m., Florida Supreme Court, 500 South Duval St., Tallahassee.)

GULF COAST PARKWAY DISCUSSED: The Florida Department of Transportation will hold a meeting in Bay County about a new two-lane road from Tyndall Parkway to Star Avenue. (Thursday, 5:30 p.m., The Callaway Arts and Conference Center, 500 Callaway Park Way, Callaway.)

INPUT SOUGHT ON AQUATIC HERBICIDE: The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will hold one in a series of public meetings about the agency’s aquatic plant herbicide-treatment program. (Thursday, 5:30 p.m., Okeechobee County Civic Center, 1750 U.S. 98 North, Okeechobee.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2019

BOARD OF MEDICINE MEETS: The Florida Board of Medicine will meet in Orange County. (Friday, 8 a.m., DoubleTree by Hilton, 5780 Major Blvd., Orlando.)

STATE COLLEGE PRESIDENTS GATHER: The Council of Presidents of the Florida College System will meet in Tallahassee. (Friday, 8:30 a.m., Association of Florida Colleges, 1725 Mahan Dr., Tallahassee.)

TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETS: The Florida Transportation Commission is scheduled to meet. (Friday, 9 a.m., Florida Department of Transportation, 605 Suwannee St., Tallahassee.)

ESTIMATING CONFERENCE MEETS: The Revenue Estimating Conference will hold what is known as an “impact” conference, which typically involves analyzing the potential costs of legislation. (Friday, 9 a.m., 117 Knott Building, the Capitol.)

HISTORICAL COMMISSION MEETS: The Florida Historical Commission will hold a quarterly meeting. (Friday, 9 a.m., Mission San Luis, 2100 West Tennessee St., Tallahassee.)

OIL SPILL MONEY EYED FOR HURRICANE RECOVERY: The Triumph Gulf Coast board, which oversees how BP oil-spill money aids Panhandle communities, will hold a special meeting to consider setting aside some of the money for Hurricane Michael relief. Board member Allan Bense, a former state House speaker from Panama City, has proposed creating the Triumph Gulf Coast Hurricane Michael Recovery Fund. The fund would be used to provide property-tax relief, bridge loans and other relief for local governments in Bay, Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla counties. (Friday, 9:30 a.m. Central time, Bay County Government Center, commission chamber, 840 West 11th St., Panama City.)

RUBIO HOLDS ‘MOBILE’ OFFICE HOURS: Staff members for U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will hold “mobile” office hours in Orange County. (Friday, 10 a.m., Eatonville Center for Families, 323 East Kennedy Blvd., Maitland.)

Comments

Abolish the "Florida Constitution Revision Commission"!!!! (It is a WEAK duplication of Florida's Legislature)... OR ...Limit Legislators to ONE 'two year term'... OR ... make voters submit to a "reading comprehension course" as a precurser to voting. "Dumbed-down" voters ALWAYS "fall victim" to the "Revision Commission's" nonsense (it' as if the CRC has been taking payoffs from "Special Interest Groups" all along...). [[Governor?!?...]]

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