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Politics

Amendment 2: Limitations on Property Tax Assessments

October 3, 2018 - 6:00am

Ballot Language: Proposing an amendment to the state constitution to permanently retain provisions currently in effect which limit property tax assessment increases on specified non-homestead real property, except for school district taxes, to 10 percent each year. If approved, the amendment removes the scheduled repeal of such provisions in 2019 and shall take effect January 1, 2019.

How The Amendment Reached The Ballot: Florida State Legislature

What Your Vote Means: A Yes vote on this measure: removes the January 1, 2019 sunset provision on the property tax assessment limitation of 10 percent each year forreal property.

A No vote on this measure: Maintains the January 1, 2019 expiration date for the 10 percent property tax limitation.

Pro: The non-homestead real property limitation caps the year-to-year increase at 10 percent. This means that, regardless of the market value increase, the taxable value can only increase by 10 percent. The failure to pass this measure would put jobs and small business development at risk. With this vote, Floridians have an opportunity to avoid a major property tax increase. Studies predict that the failure to pass this amendment would disproportionately affect renters, seniors on fixed incomes, businesses, owners of undeveloped land, and parttime residents. Renters remain especially wary of the potential failure to pass Amendment 2. Landlords claim that taxes will rise and the cost will be shifted onto the renter. Renters represent a growing portion of the population, and this measure guards their interests. According to the non-partisan group, Floridians would see a $700 million tax increase if Amendment 2 fails. This amendment recognizes and protects the value of private tax dollars.

Con: Currently, the measure does not claim any vocal opponents. However, opponents of the amendment could argue that the funds stemming from property taxes are vital to the well-being of the state. Ultimately, this would serve as a shortsighted view of the Florida economy. Opponents could claim that local governments would benefit from added revenue streams and a greater ability to provide for necessary services. However, Amendment 2 merely maintains the status quo rather than further trimming the government budget. Opponents could also claim that Amendment 2 could help serve alternative communities rather than providing tax breaks to individuals. As a final potential argument, there are questions related to whether this language needs to be present in the Florida Constitution. Tax issues could be addressed by the legislature.

 

This amendment is reprinted with permission from the James Madison Institute's 2018 Florida Constitutional Amendment Guide.  Click below to read more from our site!

Comments

Vote NO!

You are only voting for the 10% yearly tax cap to remain and become permanent by voting yes. Voting no means you are ok with the cap to expire at year end allowing taxing authorities to raise taxes more than 10% yearly. -- Vote 'yes' to keep the tax limit in place unless you reallylike tax increases.

Voting YES means you're okay permanently taking a 10% increase in property taxes... for the rest of your life. There needs to be more language. The only way to make the cap LOWER is to vote NO. Why are people okay with a 10% increase? Because someone promises they won't do more? Why is it even that high?! 10% a YEAR FOREVER. Insane that people are voting yes.

How did this even get on the Ballot? Being "So ambiguous"! It should have been labeled with more comprehensive explaining of its percentages and how low or how high it should be allowed. Not this 10% yes or no? Ambiguous is all to the end result! Should have been, less to as much!

Thank you for your clarification......the more I read the more confused I became until I came to your submission. Thank you.

Voting yes keeps the 10% yearly cap in place. Voting no means you would allow the taxing authorities to raise taxes more than 10% each year. This does not impact persons with the Homstead exemptiin.

Finally, someone who knows they he's talking about!

If commercial pays less, then homesteaders pay more

Voting no, means you want to remove the yearly caps of 10%, for example allowing taxes to go up 20%. Voting yes means you want to keep tax increases at 10% or less maintaining the current law, so people thinking voting 'no' want their taxes to increase are wrong.

People voting 'No' are voting to allow their taxes to be increased by more than 10% each year.

Voting no, means you want to remove the yearly caps of 10%, for example allowing taxes to go up 20%. Voting yes means you want to keep tax increases at 10% or less maintaining the current law, so people thinking voting 'no' want their taxes to increase are wrong.

Your taxes would only go up if you have a second home or commercial property. It only effects those with no homestead exemption. If this passes, people with Homestead Exemptions may face higher taxes when the counties increase the millage rate (percent you pay in taxes) to account for the shortage in valuation this will create. So if you don't want your main homes taxes to go up, vote "NO"!

You are absolutely. Working families will bear the burden of Amendment 2 while owners of shopping malls, oceanfront hotels and waterfront mansions benefit. This Amendment is BAD - Vote NO!

less taxes, sign me up...

You are absolutely right. Working families will bear the burden of Amendment 2 while owners of shopping malls, oceanfront hotels and waterfront mansions benefit. This Amendment is BAD - Vote NO!

Exactly what I see foresee. Voting NO.

"Less taxes, sign me up.." is NOT what's going on here. Stripping taxing authorities of the power to raise (and LOWER) taxes to meet $ needs hobbles their abilities to meet the service requirements of whatever entity they are regulating. And these agencies actually have jobs to fulfill. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean that don't get done. Inevitably, the Powers That Be will go looking for places that they can get income from... tax cigarettes, car titles (I paid $440 to retitle my car when I came to Florida) , fishing licenses, professional licenses (cut hair, wire your condo, appraise your dog house), there are 1000 little ways to do that. It makes living in Florida expensive. And it's inflationary. Vote NO.

Fugeddaboudit! Vote "No"!

So you want your property tax to increase??

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